Breast Cancer Treatment

Treatment Support

Treatment Support


Athena's founder, a breast cancer survivor, understands the importance of support. Along with a compassionate medical team, she had a wide network of personal support when she battled breast cancer. She is paying that support forward, not only through Athena® but also through advocacy and involvement with several organizations. Whether you need support as a patient, as a caregiver or as a mom, Athena wants to help you find it.


  • Support for Patients: When you're battling breast cancer, it's easy to get caught up in a whirlwind of tests, treatments and procedures. But it's also important to focus on your emotional and psychological well-being. You may find comfort through your family, friends, house of worship or spiritual group. You may benefit from a breast cancer support group, an online community or an individual counselor. Choose whatever combination works best for you. The American Cancer Society® is a great resource. Check out Reach To Recovery®, which pairs breast cancer patients with breast cancer survivors. Or try one of the Society's online communities, such as Cancer Survivors Network or I Can Cope® online cancer education classes.1 We at Athena want to provide personal support, as well. Become a fan of the Athena Facebook page, read the survivors' stories on this website or follow our blog to connect with others on your journey.
  • Support for Caregivers: It's a job you hope you never have – caring for a spouse, partner, family member or close friend who has breast cancer. Chances are, when your loved one's world was turned upside-down, so was yours. In addition to feelings of fear, worry and sadness, you may be facing overwhelming responsibilities.2 The American Cancer Society® provides wonderful resources for caregivers on topics including communication, understanding the healthcare system, legal concerns, caring for a cancer patient at home and long-distance caregiving among others.2,3 Just remember, caring for your loved one also means taking care of yourself. Lean on friends and family, seek out caregiver support groups in your area or join an online community.4 Most important, ask for help when you need it.
  • Support for Children: If you're a mom with children still at home, hearing that you have breast cancer is particularly scary. If they are very young, you may wonder how you're going to take care of them. If they're older, you may worry about how they are going to handle your diagnosis. Regardless, there are plenty of resources to help both you and your children.5 The American Cancer Society® offers tips to help children understand the disease and treatment, as well as cope with fears they may have.5 Your healthcare team is also a good source of information. Many cancer treatment centers offer programs and support groups specifically for children.

Sources:
1Find Support Programs and Services in Your Area, http://www.cancer.org/Treatment/SupportProgramsServices/index
2Being a Caregiver, http://www.cancer.org/Treatment/Caregivers/Caregiving/index
3What You Need to Know as a Cancer Caregiver, http://www.cancer.org/Treatment/Caregivers/Caregiving/WhatYouNeedtoKnow/index
4Coping as a Caregiver, http://www.cancer.org/treatment/caregivers/copingasacaregiver/index
5Helping Children When a Family Member Has Cancer, http://www.cancer.org/Treatment/ChildrenandCancer/HelpingChildrenWhenaFamilyMemberHasCancer/index